3 Reasons Why People Don’t Turn on Camera During a Webinar.

We’ve all heard the expression “Don’t judge a book by its cover.”

But this expression applies to more than just books. When it comes to webinars, people will often not turn on their cameras for fear of judgement. This is unfortunate because the person who doesn’t turn on their camera is missing out on valuable engagement that can be achieved through eye contact and non-verbal communication. Here are three reasons why people don’t turn on their cameras during a webinar. And you will know what to do as a speaker/host.

People don’t want to show their face

One of the most obvious reasons why people don’t turn on their cameras during a webinar is that they are too shy to show their faces. They are afraid of being judged by how they look, so they hide behind their camera. This is unfortunate because it really limits the opportunity to engage with the presenter and other attendees in a more personal way. However, usually, they are not being prepared to turn on their camera. For example, we didn’t tell them before the event so that they will not dress up.

They don’t want people to see them yawning

It’s uncomfortable to be on camera. It’s common to feel self-conscious when you’re on camera. People may worry that they’ll yawn or even blink too much when they are in front of a camera. They may also worry about their appearance, fearing that people will judge them based on their physical features, clothing, hair, makeup, etc.

They feel like they’re being watched.

People are often hesitant to turn on their cameras for fear that other people will see them. They feel like they’re being watched and don’t want to be judged by the person they’re talking to. But the truth is, only the person you’re talking with can see you. You can also limit who can see you by using a webcam cover or turning your face away from the camera at times.

Conclusion: What to do as a speaker/host.

To be honest, if participants don’t turn on the camera, it is the responsibility of the host. You should ask yourself:

  1. Did you prepare the participants before the event? Do they know they need to turn on the camera?
  2. Did you create a safe environment for them? an environment without judging others.
  3. Did you create a casual and fun atmosphere? People fear judgement because they take it too seriously. They think they are in the spotlight. If the atmosphere is casual and fun, they will not worry too much.

Next time, before complaining they don’t turn on the camera, ask yourself these questions first.

Originally published at https://www.linkedin.com.

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Impact Venture Builder | Social Innovation 💡| (Social/Impact) Entrepreneurial Mindset Education | Design Thinking Mindset | Yes, all about a mindset change 😎

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Cyron Chan

Cyron Chan

Impact Venture Builder | Social Innovation 💡| (Social/Impact) Entrepreneurial Mindset Education | Design Thinking Mindset | Yes, all about a mindset change 😎

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